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Englisch-Deutsch Übersetzungen für das Wort: Bee

Deutsch Englisch
Biene {f}Femininum (die) [zool.] bee
Wettbewerb {m}Maskulinum (der) bee
Backe {f}Femininum (die) [naut.] (Klampe) bee
Klampe {f}Femininum (die) [naut.] bee
Bienenbrett {n}Neutrum (das) bee board
Bienenfliege {f}Femininum (die) [zool.] bee louse
Bienengift {n}Neutrum (das) bee poison
Bienengift {n}Neutrum (das) bee venom
Bienenhaus {n}Neutrum (das) bee house
Bienenhäuser {pl}Plural (die) bee houses
Bienenlaus {f}Femininum (die) [zool.] bee louse
Bienenschutzanzug {m}Maskulinum (der) bee protection suit
Bienenwolf {m}Maskulinum (der) [zool.] (ein Käfer) bee beetle (Trichodes apiarius)
Bienenzüchter {m}Maskulinum (der) bee keeper
Bienenzüchter {pl}Plural (die) bee keepers
(Große) Wachsmotte {f}Femininum (die) [zool.] bee moth (Galleria mellonella)
Wabenpappe {f}Femininum (die) bee board
Igelschnäuzchen {pl}Plural (die) [fam.] (sehr kleine weibliche Brüste) bee bites {s} [sl.]
Mäusefäustchen {pl}Plural (die) [fam.] (kleine weibliche Brüste) bee bites {s} [sl.]
Bienenharz {n}Neutrum (das) bee glue
Bienenläuse {pl}Plural (die) [zool.] bee lice
Bienenfliegen {pl}Plural (die) [zool.] bee lice
Bienenstich {m}Maskulinum (der) [med., vet.] (Stich einer Biene) bee sting
Bienenkorb {m}Maskulinum (der) bee hive


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Beispielsätze

I know that everything was turning round, and the words of the clergyman were just like the buzz of a bee in my ear.
The nosferatu do not die like the bee when he sting once.
CONTENTS THE BROTHERS GRIMM FAIRY TALES THE GOLDEN BIRD HANS IN LUCK JORINDA AND JORINDEL THE TRAVELLING MUSICIANS OLD SULTAN THE STRAW, THE COAL, AND THE BEAN BRIAR ROSE THE DOG AND THE SPARROW THE TWELVE DANCING PRINCESSES THE FISHERMAN AND HIS WIFE THE WILLOW-WREN AND THE BEAR THE FROG-PRINCE CAT AND MOUSE IN PARTNERSHIP THE GOOSE-GIRL THE ADVENTURES OF CHANTICLEER AND PARTLET RAPUNZEL FUNDEVOGEL THE VALIANT LITTLE TAILOR HANSEL AND GRETEL THE MOUSE, THE BIRD, AND THE SAUSAGE MOTHER HOLLE LITTLE RED-CAP [LITTLE RED RIDING HOOD] THE ROBBER BRIDEGROOM TOM THUMB RUMPELSTILTSKIN CLEVER GRETEL THE OLD MAN AND HIS GRANDSON THE LITTLE PEASANT FREDERICK AND CATHERINE SWEETHEART ROLAND SNOWDROP THE PINK CLEVER ELSIE THE MISER IN THE BUSH ASHPUTTEL THE WHITE SNAKE THE WOLF AND THE SEVEN LITTLE KIDS THE QUEEN BEE THE ELVES AND THE SHOEMAKER THE JUNIPER-TREE THE TURNIP CLEVER HANS THE THREE LANGUAGES THE FOX AND THE CAT THE FOUR CLEVER BROTHERS LILY AND THE LION THE FOX AND THE HORSE THE BLUE LIGHT THE RAVEN THE GOLDEN GOOSE THE WATER OF LIFE THE TWELVE HUNTSMEN THE KING OF THE GOLDEN MOUNTAIN DOCTOR KNOWALL THE SEVEN RAVENS THE WEDDING OF MRS FOX THE SALAD THE STORY OF THE YOUTH WHO WENT FORTH TO LEARN WHAT FEAR WAS KING GRISLY-BEARD IRON HANS CAT-SKIN SNOW-WHITE AND ROSE-RED THE BROTHERS GRIMM FAIRY TALES THE GOLDEN BIRD A certain king had a beautiful garden, and in the garden stood a tree which bore golden apples.
THE QUEEN BEE Two kings’ sons once upon a time went into the world to seek their fortunes; but they soon fell into a wasteful foolish way of living, so that they could not return home again.
And as pressing, rubbing, or striking the Eye, makes us fancy a light; and pressing the Eare, produceth a dinne; so do the bodies also we see, or hear, produce the same by their strong, though unobserved action, For if those Colours, and Sounds, were in the Bodies, or Objects that cause them, they could not bee severed from them, as by glasses, and in Ecchoes by reflection, wee see they are; where we know the thing we see, is in one place; the apparence, in another.
And Suppose Them Incorporeall And for the matter, or substance of the Invisible Agents, so fancyed; they could not by naturall cogitation, fall upon any other conceipt, but that it was the same with that of the Soule of man; and that the Soule of man, was of the same substance, with that which appeareth in a Dream, to one that sleepeth; or in a Looking-glasse, to one that is awake; which, men not knowing that such apparitions are nothing else but creatures of the Fancy, think to be reall, and externall Substances; and therefore call them Ghosts; as the Latines called them Imagines, and Umbrae; and thought them Spirits, that is, thin aereall bodies; and those Invisible Agents, which they feared, to bee like them; save that they appear, and vanish when they please.
And to the Worship, which naturally men conceived fit to bee used towards their Gods, namely Oblations, Prayers, Thanks, and the rest formerly named; the same Legislators of the Gentiles have added their Images, both in Picture, and Sculpture; that the more ignorant sort, (that is to say, the most part, or generality of the people,) thinking the Gods for whose representation they were made, were really included, and as it were housed within them, might so much the more stand in feare of them: And endowed them with lands, and houses, and officers, and revenues, set apart from all other humane uses; that is, consecrated, and made holy to those their Idols; as Caverns, Groves, Woods, Mountains, and whole Ilands; and have attributed to them, not onely the shapes, some of Men, some of Beasts, some of Monsters; but also the Faculties, and Passions of men and beasts; as Sense, Speech, Sex, Lust, Generation, (and this not onely by mixing one with another, to propagate the kind of Gods; but also by mixing with men, and women, to beget mongrill Gods, and but inmates of Heaven, as Bacchus, Hercules, and others;) besides, Anger, Revenge, and other passions of living creatures, and the actions proceeding from them, as Fraud, Theft, Adultery, Sodomie, and any vice that may be taken for an effect of Power, or a cause of Pleasure; and all such Vices, as amongst men are taken to be against Law, rather than against Honour.
OF THE NATURALL CONDITION OF MANKIND, AS CONCERNING THEIR FELICITY, AND MISERY Nature hath made men so equall, in the faculties of body, and mind; as that though there bee found one man sometimes manifestly stronger in body, or of quicker mind then another; yet when all is reckoned together, the difference between man, and man, is not so considerable, as that one man can thereupon claim to himselfe any benefit, to which another may not pretend, as well as he.
Let him therefore consider with himselfe, when taking a journey, he armes himselfe, and seeks to go well accompanied; when going to sleep, he locks his dores; when even in his house he locks his chests; and this when he knows there bee Lawes, and publike Officers, armed, to revenge all injuries shall bee done him; what opinion he has of his fellow subjects, when he rides armed; of his fellow Citizens, when he locks his dores; and of his children, and servants, when he locks his chests.
It belongeth therefore to the Soveraigne to bee Judge, and to praescribe the Rules of Discerning Good and Evill; which Rules are Lawes; and therefore in him is the Legislative Power.


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